Measures Under Development

Here we provide information on stress measures that are newly developed or currently under development. We want your help adding measures to this list! Email ideas to Alexandra.Crosswell@ucsf.edu

Measures Under Development
Physical properties of the human voice, particularly fundamental frequency (f0), have been linked to variety of physiological, behavioral, and affective outcomes that suggest it may be a promising new method of stress measurement. Initial findings suggest that adding audio recordings of vocal responses to stress assessment may be fruitful. Examination of vocal indices may be a lower cost, efficient method of capturing affective and physiological reactivity.
Measures Under Development
Mobile phone sensing data: The Effortless Assessment of Risk States (E.A.R.S.) tool is a suite of programs installed on the user’s mobile phone that collect naturalistic behavior. Passive mobile phone sensing data, which is collected on an ongoing basis, may be able to examine the effect of stressors. It also has the advantage of measuring objective, naturalistic behavioral data. This tool was a part of Obama White House’s Opportunity Project in August 2016, a technology development “sprint” to create new open digital tools to help communities (tinyurl.com/y75pla5m).
Measures Under Development
The Stress in Context (SIC) questionnaire is being developed to address limitations of existing measures of global perceived stress. The SIC assesses stress perceptions in specific contexts, such as at home, neighborhood, in social relationships, at work, and during childhood. Weighting stress perceptions to each of these contexts may help remind people of the many potential sources of perceived stress from their environment, and thus bea more accurate summative measure of perceived stress. Currently, the SIC is being validated by the Stress Measurement Network, led by Wendy Berry Mendes. So far, it is equivalent to the PSS in self-report measures of psychological distress, well-being, and self-reported health, but shows a unique relationship to resting sympathetic state.
Measures Under Development
The Community Child Health Network Life Stress Interview is a brief 15-minute interview that was adapted form the UCLA Life Stress Interview (Hammen et al., 1987) and assesses four domains of chronic stress - neighborhood environment, family relationships, partner relationships, and co-parenting.